Senin, 11 Juli 2011

It's nice to witness these discoveries at first hand


I was cogitating over the etymology of testimony.   Primarily because the word exhibits a striking similarity to  . . . uh . . . the doodads of the masculine form . . . you know what I’m trying to say . . . er . . .  man-sacks . . . ugh . . . testicles.  There, I said it!


Whew! 

So, what is the connection between these two words that seem to have no obvious association?  

Allow me to elucidate.  Testimony, testify, testis, and testicle  . . .  in Latin testis means “witness.  How did we get from witness to teabags? 

It is stated that under Roman law that only verifiable men were allowed to provide testimony.  A man could not testify unless his testicles were at hand as verification of his maleness . . . and I mean literally, at hand.  Way back then they didn’t have the King James Bible to swear an oath on . . . they made their vow of truthfulness on the thing (or thingies) that were most sacred to them . . . their whoop-dee-doos.  Romans placed their right hands on their testicles and swore by them before giving testimony in court.


I’m not sure if that clarifies anything, or even if it’s factual,  but it’s intriguing nonetheless.

Interestingly, to detest means “to bear witness against;” therefore, to curse, and implicitly, to hate one’s testiculi . . . i.e. ones little witnesses . . . just sayin’.





Creamy Coleslaw

1 large heads cabbage, shredded
1 large carrots, shredded
2/3 cups mayonnaise or salad dressing
1/3 cup sugar
1/8 cup white vinegar
1/5 tablespoons celery seed
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon garlic powder

In a gallon sized zipper bag, combine the cabbage and carrots.

In a bowl, combine the remaining ingredients. Pour into the bag with the cabbage mixture. 

Seal and squeeze the bag to combine the ingredients.  

Refrigerate for at least 1 hour. Toss before serving.

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